General Admission

Biden to inherit a damaged White House

By Al S. Mendoza

 

BEFORE Joe Biden was elected president of the United States on November 4 (PHL time), he served the American government for 47 years.

If there’s one American politician soaked in public service almost half of his life—and counting—it’s Biden.

Biden was only 29 years old when he first won as senator.

If that’s not amazing, what is?

He would proceed to serve five terms as senator.

If that’s not awesome, what is?

He was twice vice president of the U.S. under the two terms of Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012.

If that’s not incredible, what is?

When Biden moves to the White House on January 20 to begin his first four-year term, he becomes the oldest President of the U.S.

Born in 1942 in Pennsylvania, Biden turns 78 on November 20.

More than ripe to become America’s 46th president.

In his victory speech in Wilmington, Delaware, Biden said: “I am not the president of the blue states, nor am I the president of the red states.  I am the president of the American people.”

Blue is Biden’s color as a Democrat and red is deposed president Donald Trump’s as a Republican.

As I write this, Trump has not conceded, accusing Biden of “stealing the election” without presenting an iota of evidence.  Pathetic.

Trump’s several petitions alleging vote fraud, which were basically unsubstantiated, were dismissed by several courts in disputed states like Nevada, Michigan, Arizona, North Carolina, Georgia and Pennsylvania.  Expected.

He kept unleashing a barrage of protests even as the counting was still going on, even as Biden was fast building a margin of more than four million people’s votes of the tabulated 150-million plus ballots.

But as earlier mentioned here, the American Constitution does not allow the people’s votes to decide the winner in American presidential elections.

The Electoral College does that, whose members are chosen through district representation based on population of each of America’s 50 states.

The magic number of victory for a presidential bet is 270 from the total 538 electoral votes.

At first, the battle for the Electoral College votes was close, with Biden eventually inching ahead of Trump, 254-214.

Biden clinched it when he won Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes.

But that all the more prodded Trump to pursue his protest, repeating his voter fraud allegations in an un-presidential stance, questioning the integrity of the election and effectively putting American democracy on trial itself.

I am not really that surprised, though.

In his four-year reign, Trump’s arrogance, defiance of decorum and an insanely outrageous style of governance was palpably contemptible.

Before Trump upset Hillary Clinton in 2016 to win the most powerful post in the world, he’s never held a single elected post in government.

From private citizen straight to the White House.  Stunning.

But that was also his undoing.

His inexperience—zero experience, actually—in public office became his noose.

His damning downfall was as inevitable as thunder following lightning.

Trump was an empty blackboard, a politician without savvy, bereft of astuteness, lacking in diplomacy abundantly found in a seasoned politician.

Like the spoiled brat bent on not accepting defeat, Trump would cloak himself with a false façade of invincibility, eventually losing focus of irreversible reality.

The world has never seen an American president as crude, if not as turgid, as Trump.

Biden moves to a White House needing major repairs.  Good luck.

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