Sual barangay officials seek SP intervention

POLLUTION FROM  FISH CAGES

LINGAYEN—The provincial board officials are set to conduct a probe on the complaint filed by barangay officials of Sual town on the worsening pollution allegedly caused by the operation of fish cages in the town for the past eight years.

The officials of Barangay Baybay Norte sought the intervention of the provincial board on the problems that long festered residents caused by fish cages operation in nearby barangays.

In a letter dated Sept. 24, 2018 of the barangay council of Baybay Norte, addressed to Vice Governor Jose Ferdinand Calimlim Jr, the provincial board’s presiding officer, the officials pointed to the wastes thrown coming from the cages like plastics and sacks, and floating dead bangus that leave odious smell that pose health hazard to residents living near the sea and to the children studying at Baybay Elementary School.

Fourth District Board Member Liberato Villegas, chair of the provincial board’s Committee on Environment, said his committee will conduct an ocular inspection where the fish cages are built.

The letter also said the barangay council has sent letters to the the mayor and the municipal agriculturist but there has been no response and action taken.

Fourth District Board Member Jeremy Agerico Rosario, who chairs the Committee on Health, also indicated his committee will get involve in this issue since it concerns health. Sixth District Board Member Noel Bince, who heads the Committee on Laws and Ordinances, also asked that his committee be part of the probe team.

Based on an earlier interview, Sual Mayor Roberto Arcinue said his town maintains its record as the top producer of bangus (milkfish) in Pangasinan with the town’s 750 fish cages where bangus are grown along the Cabalitian Bay in this town.

The fish cages contribute about P15-million annual income to the municipal coffers from the permits and use of municipal water, Arcinue said. Each fish cage grows 45,000 to 60,000 bangus, he said.

Daily bangus harvest here averages 60 tons. (PhilStar Wire Service)

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